Tag Archives: Connected TV

The Connected TV Usability Index – coming soon…

The Connected TV blog seems a good place to announce a new venture which farncombe, which hosts this site, is currently working on. This new endeavour involves benchmarking the usability of connected TV devices.

Those of us with access to a connected TV experience – whether on a smart TV, games console, laptop, tablet or set-top box – will all have our favourite bugbears about the connected user experience: the number of clicks it takes to call up a particular piece of on-demand content, over-complex remotes that don’t match what’s on the EPG, screens that are difficult to navigate, etc. etc.

But is it possible to create a standardised set of objective, quantifiable tests with which to assess and compare the user-friendliness of all these different screens?

Well, farncombe thinks it is. Using the knowledge and experience of its engineers at the Farncombe Test Lab in Vauxhall, London (which is already carrying out technical testing on some of our clients’ hybrid receivers), as well as the EPG design knowhow of its user experience practice, WeAreAka, farncombe has worked out a standardised battery of tests that assesses the most common ‘user journeys’ on connected TV devices, the types of feature that improve usability, and the kind of bad UX design practices best avoided.

Over the coming months farncombe will be refining its thinking, testing an initial batch of connected TV devices, and publishing some of the early results as a new industry monitor provisionally dubbed ‘The Connected TV Usability Index’.

The intention is to create a benchmark for viewers and industry alike, by regularly reporting which connected TV devices are ‘best in class’ for a particular usability category – and thereby helping consumers make a more informed choice as they migrate towards this complex emerging market. The first manufacturers are already signed up.

Farncombe believes that manufacturers and operators alike will find the index a valuable tool to help them understand how to enhance the TV viewing user experience.

If you are a connected TV device manufacturer and you believe your user experience is best-in-class, then there is still time for you to be involved at no cost. Please click here to contact us.

If you want to share with us your suggestions about those features you believe should be on our shortlist – and even those which are the most irritating – then we welcome your comments.

Watch this space for more details!

Only 37% will buy connected TVs for broadband – YouGov

A survey by UK pollster YouGov suggests that well under half of UK consumers (37%) planning to buy a Connected TV will buy it because it is broadband-enabled. Instead, the most common reason for intending to buy one is simply having a more up-to-date TV – a factor cited by 50% of potential purchasers.

YouGov found that the most important feature of Connected TVs amongst people who already owned one was the picture quality (cited by 96% of owners) followed by the size of the screen (93%) then sound quality (89%).

Furthermore, only half (53%) of Connected TV owners correctly identified a Connected TV as a TV that connects to the Internet without the need for another device; while one in four (25%) Connected TV owners have never used it to connect to the internet.

YouGov commented that the profile for adoption of Connected TV sets in technology terms was “very similar” to that of iPad owners: “These are the kind of people who are willing to make a big ticket purchase without quite realising what they’ve bought.”

Other data shows that amongst owners of Connected TVs, over one third (36%) have a Sony, followed by Samsung (33%) then Panasonic (16%). However, almost two-thirds (62%) of people planning to purchase one in the next 12 months are considering Samsung, followed by Sony (48%) and Panasonic (40%).

Meanwhile, over one quarter (26%) say they plan to buy an Apple TV, even though the manufacturer has not yet launched one.

The research is likely to be a major talking-point at the Connected TV Summit later this week, at which farncombe will be speaking as well as chairing.

Intel exits connected TV to focus on STBs, smartphones and laptops

According to Bloomberg, Intel is abandoning plans to supply its processors to manufacturers of connected TVs, although it plans to maintain its presence in the TV set-top box market.

Bloomberg quoted an Intel spokesperson who described it as “a business decision where we’re taking those resources and applying them to corporate priorities.” Engineers in its Digital Home Group will now re-focus on tablets, smartphones and a new type of laptop Intel has dubbed the ‘Ultrabook’.

Intel’s ambitions for the connected TV market first emerged in 2007 in the shape of its ‘Canmore’ chip, later known as the CE 3100 media processor. The first iteration was demonstrated at an Intel Developers Forum in summer 2008, before becoming the enabling platform for the Yahoo Widget connected TV demos at CES 2009.

Its successor, the CE 4100, part of Intel’s low-powered Atom series, has scored some notable successes in the set-top box market – with Comcast in the US and Liberty Global in Europe, as well as with Google’s Google TV. However, the Atom series has failed to make any significant impact on manufacturers of connected TV sets.